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wellesley 
College News 


WELLESLEY, MASS., FEBRUARY 29, 1912. 




fnfK 




■ WSw voL- xx 


No. 20 



THE WELLESLEY COLLEGE NEWS 



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Do you realize that the 

Wellesley National Bank 

has safe and convenient vaults for your val- 
uables ? 

How much do you think it would cost 
you to duplicate some of your valuables if 
they were either stolen or burned? 

Why not be secure? 



J. H. 



CHARLES N. TAYLOR, President, 
, Vice-Pres., B. W. GUERNSEY, Cashier 



Very Exclusive for Students 

Neatly Engraved 




VISITING CARDS and 
MONOGRAM STATIONERY 



We also make a specialty of Invitations, 
Menus, Programs, Etc. Ask to see samplesat the COLLEGE 
BOOK STORE. 

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57=63 Franklin St., Boston. 



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Established 1901 

PHARMACISTS SHATTUCK BLDG. 
WELLESLEY. 

Prescriptions compounded accurately with 
purest drugs and chemicals obtainable j£ 



Complete Line of High Grade Stationery 
and Sundries 

Waterman Ideal Fountain Pen 



CANDIES FROM 

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Eastman Kodaks and Camera Supplies 
VISIT OUR SODA FOUNTAIN 

Pure Fruit Syrups Fresh Fruit in Season 

Ice-Cream from C. M. McKechnie & Co. 



TLhe Melleeley College IFlcws 



VOL. XX. 



Entered at the Post Office in Wellesley, Man., at tecond-cUss matter. 



WELLESLEY, IHBKUARY >'>, 1012. 






STUDENT GOVERNMENT MEETING. 

Ill, third Studenl Governmeni meeting ol the 
year was held on Tuesday, Februarj 20, al 4.30 
P.M., in ( 'ollege I fall ( hapel, .ill a< ademii ap 
pointments having been cancelled after 4. 15 P.M. 
The proposed amendmem to the constitution, pre- 
sented and signed by twentj members of the As* - 
ciation, providing thai the vesper service in the 
( hapel should, al Christmas and Easter time, be open 
only i" members ol the college, was disi ussed and 
voted upon. The amendmem was nol accepted. 

Several earnesl and spirited speeches were made 
concerning noise during recitation hours, on Sun- 
days, and al vespers. Miss Bingham read a letter 
received from Miss Brooks about ink in the li- 
brary, and a bill to the Association for twenty-six 
dollars for unpaid damage, and Miss Stoneham 
challenged the Association, in a highly effective 
speech, to live up to its standards of honor, and pay 
the ink bills individually, that the whole Associa- 
tion need not suffer for the carelessness or laxity of 
individual members. 

The Association heard with regret of Miss Doro- 
thy Q. Applegate's resignation as chairman of the 
Student-Alumnae Building Fund, though the ap- 
pointment of Edna Swope to take her place, the ex- 
citing ceremony of unveiling the Student-Alumnae 
Building Fund Bulletin Board, and Miss Swope's 
announcement of future plans, especially the pro- 
curing of a mile of pennies, promised that the com- 
mittee will be the same wide-awake, effective 01- 
ganization that it has always been. 

The Association has been granted permanent 
times for its meetings within the academic sched- 
ule; Miss Bingham's announcement of the dates of 
the remaining meetings of the year was received 
with the enthusiasm and delight that an announce- 
ment so significant of the vigor and growth of the 
Association would necessarily call out. A unan- 
imous vote of thanks was gladly extended to the 
Academic Council for this tangible expression of 
their co-operation with the Student Government 
Association. 

GLEE AND MANDOLIN CLUBS' CONCERT. 



The same festivity in the air, the same gay 
gowns and transformed College Hall Center, marked 
Glee Club times again, on February 2\ and 22. .\> 
the carnival of the year. The Glee and Mandolin 
Clubs were splendidly ready for the concert, and 
responded excellently to their leaders, Ruth Hypes 



and Eleanor Hall. 1 

pe< ia.ll) spirited; the quii 

pretati and 'harm, and with 

blended voii >--. Ruth 1 1 
beautiful; she managed h'-r voi 

and Imt enunt i 
perfe< tion. 

" Bella Mazurka" was, perl 
quisite thin.; given bj the Mandolin « lub 
club played ii perfectly; ih<- fine discrimii 
and delicate shading of interpn 
quick ■ hangi - in tempo made the rem: 
cially enjo\ able. " I 

nun on t he Volg ul in 

its descriptive -hading; there was hardh 

planat ion of the approach and wtthdrav 
the barge of boatmen on the program. - clearly 
was the sense of distance, of music ov< r the 
of the heavy triad of the boatmen and ■•( their 
plaintive song, given by the mandolins. 

The "Skeleton Dame." played by the Mandolin 
Club, was decidedly original and amusing in the 
manner of its rendition. All the lights were turned 
off except the foot-lights, and the club app< ared in 
black glasses. Whether or no1 the\ gave the ap- 
pearance of skeleton- i- an open qui stion, but they 
certainly amused their audience. 

The Topical Song "took."* and with 

what seemed like unusual success. I' 
clever song and cleverly sung; further, it « - 
telligible to outsiders, being delocalized to such an 
extent that the guests could see its points and roar 
at them, so it i> no wonder it elicited much ap] 

Altogether, the (dee Club concert was highly 
successful. 

Pr< igram. 

Tan One. 

I. 'Neath the Oaks. 

Glee Club. 

II. Westward. Ho! G. L. I 

Mandolin Club. 

III. Rolling Down to Rio Edward Gi 

Idee Club. 

IV. (a) Evening Chimes T. I 

(b) Adele J - ' 

Quartet — Mandolin Club. 

V. Laughing Song B. 1 

Glee Club. 

VI. Bella Mazurka 

Mandolin Club. 

inued on pa] 



THE WELLESLEY COLLEGE NEWS. 



TOPICAL SONG. 



Tune: Bless Your Ever Loving Little Heart. 
I. 
Popular Junior, when tired 

Of satellites clustering 'round, 
Yearning for rest, with attentions oppress'd, 
From a window-sill slid softly to the ground, 
Spending a half hour with nature. 

Herald and Post said next day, 
"Prominent Wellesley girl missing! 

Kidnapped by the Soph'mores on May Day." 

When Jane is fined for splashing 

Ink on the Lib'ry floor — 
The Boston papers print it — 

"She is struggling at death's door!" 
Those papers! 
When you confide in reporters, 
Mother, next morning, sees 
Scandal reported, your words distorted, 
For the paper spies it. 
Xo matter who denies it — 
You'd hardly recognize such 
Juicy Bits. 

II. 
If for two weeks you'd been cramming, 

Worked till you wanted to bat, 
What would you say, if you found out one day, 

That the Faculty were really shocked at that! 
But don't you get discouraged, 

I'll whisper you a plan; 
If you want a dance at Glee Club, 

Get a highly recommended man. 

Chorus. 
Write to your man for Glee Club, 

Ask for his pedigree. 
Does he wear pale blue neckties, 
Or put lemon in his tea? — 
His wages? 
Does he believe in suffrage, does he turn out his 
toes? 
References expected or he'll be rejected 
Ere he to a Glee Club, a dance right after Glee 

Club— 
A real man-dance at Wellesley Glee Club goes. 

III. 

(riven — one girl on probation. 

Find: the extent of her wrath 
When her bid came to the Yale-Harvard game, 

And she realized she couldn't cut her math! 
Sadly she went to the classroom, 

Friends had gone off on the train. 
Stated the Pons Assinorum — 

"From Y to z just fifteen yards to gain!" 



We're keen on calisthenics, 

Physical training, too — 
Haven't you seen that Wellesley 

Throngs the Stadium when you 
Play football? 
We think you play too roughly. 

We'd like to show you all 
Gentle athletics, based on aesthetics, 
Most uplifting science. 
With ladylike defiance, 
We bid you watch our Giants 
Play base-ball. 

IV. 

Back in the days of creation 

Each Freshman class gave a play. 
Harriet was new, and the Backwoodsman, too, 

When we had to go to chapel every day. 
Ere English II studied Pater 

When all lights went out at ten, 
When we had no elevator, 

College girls were Bromides even then. 

Chorus. 

My dear, have you heard the latest? 

Yes, and she's such a pill. 
Can't get a man for Glee Club — 
Are you going to the v : ll — 
Believe me ! 
Almost missed out on breakfast. 

Dean - , come out to walk. 
Isn't that screaming — 
Wake up, you're dreaming — 
How do your exams, come? I sure will have to 

cram some — 
It comes through every transom — 
Bromide talk! 

Extra Chorus for Bromide Verse. 

Sick of the sight of mutton! 

Got any alcohol? 
Wasn't so very shaggy, 

Going up to College Hall? 
You peanut! 
Save me a seat at Stu. G. 
Was that the bell? Good-night! 
Who's seen my roommate — 
My, but the mail's late! 
Can't read her corrections. 
You'll ruin your complexions! 
It comes from all directions — 
Bromide talk! 

(Continued on page 8) 



THE WELLESLEY COLLEGE NEWS 




Editor-in-Chief, Muriel Bacheler, 191 2 

Associate Editor, Cathrene H. Peebles, 191 2 

Literary Editors. 

Margaret Law, 1912 Marjorie Sherman, 1012 

Helen Logan, 1913 Sarah Parker, 1913 

Susan Wilbur, 1913 

Reporters. 

Carol Prentice, 1913 Kathlene Burnett, 1913 

Charlotte Conover, 1914 

Business Manager, Frances Gray, 1912 

Associate Business Manager, Josephine Guion, 1013 

Assistant Business Manager, Ellen Howard, 1914 

Subscription Editor, Dorothy Blodgett, 1912 

Alumna Editor, Bertha March, 189s 

Advertising Business Manager, Bertha M. Beckford, 

Wellesley College. 



The Wellesley College News is published weekly from 
October to July, by a board of editors chosen from the student 
body. 

All literary contributions may be sent to Miss Muriel Bach- 
eler, Wellesley College, Wellesley, Mass. 

All items of college interest will be received by Miss Cath- 
rene H. Peebles, Wellesley College, Wellesley, Mass. 

All Alumnae News should be sent to Miss Bertha March, 
394 Massachusetts Ave., Boston, Mass. 

All business communications should be sent to Miss Frances 
Gray, Wellesley College, Wellesley, Mass. 

Subscriptions should be sent to Miss Dorothy Blodgett, 
Wellesley College, Wellesley, Mass. 

Terms, Jl .50 for residents and non-residents; single copies, 
:s cents. 



EDITORIALS. 

Student Government Meetings. 

It is hardly necessary to make any comment upon 
the significance of an established time for Student 
Government meetings within the academic sched- 
ule, but it is certainly impossible to keep from doing 
so. We are not the same Association that we were 
when you were young, 1912, nor you, 1913 and 
1914; even you have seen the change come, 1915. 
Now we are incorporated, not only in spirit, but 
also outwardly, in the most essential life of the col- 
lege; the new dignit}- and vigor that has come upon 
the Association is a sign of a leap in its develop- 

JAMES K. GEORGAS, 

Successor to P. E. SALIPANTE. 
& & FRUIT DEALER & -^ 

Fine Confectionery and Biscuits 

Orders for College and Dana Hall attended to promptly. 

We make a Specialty of Fruit in Baskets. 

Tel. 413R Wellesley. I Grove St. 1st store from station. 



DR. L. D. H. FULLER. 

DENTIST 

Next to Welletley Inn. telephone 145-2. 
Hours: 8.30—5.30 Daily, Tuesdays excepted. 



ment, and er potentiality within h 

; before. 

Mediocrity and Credit Cards. 
Ii is true that credit cards have been talk* 1 
until the Bubjed might well be Aorn thrc;.' 
but the fact is that it is not. Probably nin«-tenths 
of us had the feeling borne in upon u 
9aw our marl:-, instead of a neat little r< 
its, that we were hopelessly mediocre. 
many of us shrugged off the disagreeable thought 
with a laugh or tea at South Natick Inn: perhaps 
some of us reflected that if commonplace people 
hadn't been a favorite form of creation, there never 
would have been so many made; but certainly with 
a large number of us, the thought rankle?. We 
feel, somehow, that we have not done our best, or 
that it was not fair that our brains should ha\ 1 
made incapable of any splendid, worth-while 
achievement. However we may take it. the fact 
remains that we are, most of us, mediocre. Of 
course it won't seem so a few weeks from n<.w; 
when you walk to church beside your father on 
Easter Sunday, with the air full of music and the 
odor of flowers, and the bright sun drying up the 
wet places on the pavement, you will feel like a 
princess or a saint, especially since your father will 
probably think you a little of both; but that won't 
alter the case. The fact that we are very ordi- 
nary in mental achievement and potentiality is a 
fundamental one — it is also a very challenging and 
inspiring one, if we only face it with enough cour- 
age and frankness. Wry ordinary — therefore sin- 
gularly capable of giving sympathy and friend- 
ship, of admiring and encouraging the unordinary 
ones! Very ordinary — therefor and in the 

hottest of the battle, fighting on too;, and indis- 
pensable to the plans of the command' _ 
If all that sounds a little ecstatic to you. i^ 
facts as they are about yourself, then go out 
eyed for a walk out Upland Road and a shouli 
of your difficulties, and you will come 
vinced that for once the News is right — mor 
you will be glad that credit cards came 
did. 



THE LESLIE, Marblehead, Mass. 

Open year round. On harbor. Fr.v.v. ? eek- 

end parties desired. Address, hi. M. Z 1ER. 



THE WELLESLEY COLLEGE NEWS. 



(Continued from page I.) 

GLEE AND MANDOLIN CLUBS' CONCERT. 



Part Two. 



I. Skeleton Dance Thomas S. Allen 

Mandolin Club. 

II. (a) The Mermaid's Song Bella Coale 

Quintet — Glee Club, 
(b) Norwegian Love Song. . .Clough-Leighton 
Miss Hypes. 

III. Crucifix J. Taure 

Mandolin Club. 

IV. Summer Night Gade 

Glee Club. 

Deep shadowed in the dusky night 

The forest trees are waving. 
And all their glorious summits green 

The stars with light are laving. 

The streamlet murmurs in the wood. 

Where flower buds are dreaming; 
While stars from heav'n pour down their rays. 

Thro' the dark foliage gleaming. 

From yonder stars in silent night 
I hear these words descending: 
"Our watchful radiance ever wakes 
Your peaceful sleep defending." 

The timid deer, the tender fiow'r. 

With heads bow'd down are sleeping, 
They have no fear, they seem to know 

The stars are vigils keeping. 

V. The Song of the Russian Boatmen of the 

Volga. 

Mandolin Club. 

The barges laden with lumber are ap- 
proaching. As they draw near the heavy 
tread of the boatmen is heard, and their 
plaintive song. It gradually diminishes 
as the barge passes away in the distance. 

VI. Topical Song Miss Hypes 

VII. (a) Medley G. L. Lansing 

Mandolin Club. 
(b) Alma Mater. 

Glee and Mandolin Clubs. 

Officers of the Glee Club. 

Leader Ruth Hypes, 1913 

President Ruth S. Rodman, 1912 

Accompanist Katherine Mortenson, 1912 

Assistant Accompanist. . . . Mildred Washburn, 1912 

First Sopranos: Dorothy Bullard. 1912, Helen 
M. Faton, 1912, Ruth Hypes, 1913, Natalie Will- 
iams. 1913, Alice E. Wormwood. 1913. 



Second Sopranos: Dorothy Brown, 1914, Louise 
Eppich, 1913, Mary Katherine Giles, 1914. Sylvia 
Gouldston, 1914, Dorothy Hart, 1912, Florence 
Talpey, 1912, Margaret Tuttle, 1913. 

First Altos: Helen K. Goss, 1912, Clara New- 
house, 1914, Lucy K. Roberts, 1912, Ruth S. Rod- 
man, 1912. 

Second Altos: Margaret R. Buckley, 1912, 
Rachel Burbank, 1913, Mary Clark, 1913, Carol S. 
Prentice, 1913. 

Quintet: Miss Hypes, Miss Bullard, Miss Rod- 
man, Miss Goss, Miss Talpey. 

Officers of the Mandolin Club. 

Leader Eleanor S. Hall, 1912 

Assistant Leader Marjorie M. Soule, 1913 

President Lib M. Zimmerman, 1912 

First Mandolin: Ruth Blaisdell, 1913, Artus 
James, 1913, Harriet Selkirk, 1913. Eleanor Wheeler, 
1912, Edith Wilson, 1913, Lib Zimmerman, 1912. 

Second Mandolin: Dorothy Q. Applegate. 1912. 
Helen Froeligh, 1913, Elizabeth Haynes, 1913, 
Mabel Winslow, 1913. 

Third Mandolin: Elsie Buttery, 1914. Susan 
Wilbur, 1913. 

Banjo: M. Agnes Butler, 1913, Dorothy Eber- 
sole, 1914, Dorothy Clark, 1913, Helen L. Ely, Sp., 
Edith Hewitt, 1912, Hester E. Young, 1912. 

Violin: Claire Rosenberg, 1912. 

Guitar: Dorothy Croasdale, 1914, Marian E. 
Johnson, 1912, Imogene S. Morse, 1914, Marjorie 
M. Soule, 1913, Alice Shoemaker, 1914, Margaret 
Stone. 1914. 

Tenor Mandola: Anne E. Nutt. 1914, Dorothy 
Culver, 1914. 

Bass Viol: Marion Prince. 1913. 

Tympanies: Lib Zimmerman, 1912. 

Director: G. L. Lansing. 

Quartet: Miss Hall, Miss James. Miss Soule. 
Miss Culver. 



CIRCULO CASTELLANO. 



A meeting of the Circulo Castellano was held in 
the Alpha Kappa Chi House. A paper on current 
events in Spain was read by Hazel Smith. Mabel 
Silsby gave an account of the life and works of 
Pardo Bezan, the famous Spanish woman who is 
considered one of the finest modern authors. The 
rest of the evening was spent in concocting Spanish 
dishes and the members enjoyed some real Spanish 
pisto agua conazucarillo, chocolate and tortillas. 



THE WELLESLEY COLLEGE NEWS 



Professor Clark's Lecture OH Spanish Art. 



On Mondaj evening, Februar [9, Prol 
Charles ' pson Clark of Vale lectured on Spanish 
An. In her introduction Miss Busbee represented 
Spain is the continuator and preserver of l<r,in;iri 

art. 

Professor Clark emphasized, first of all, W( 
ley's peculiar connection with the International 
[nstitution for Girls in Madrid, and reminded us 
that this college offers unusual a<l\ antages to Amer- 
ican women .1- well as Spanish, in the study of 
Spanish art. !!<■ showed views of the buildings, not 
strikingly un-American architecturally, and of 
small girl pupils exercising out-of-doors. 

Professor Clark next emphasized Spain's linkage 
with America by refuting the commonly accepted 
theory that our S mark is a composite of our U and 
S. Instead it is of Spanish origin, formed of the 
pillars of Hercules, crossed by a scroll bearing the 
motto, "plus ultra." He said, "If it is true that 
we value the dollar above everything else, then 
Spain has contributed the keystone to our success! " 

He touched briefly on the geographic and his- 
torical conditions of Spain, showing a map repre- 
senting Spain as divided between Christian and 
Moor. 

The body of the lecture dealt with noted paint- 
ings in Spanish galleries of different localities: 
Bica, as closely allied with Southern France, 
Madiid, as typifying Central Spain, and Cual. 

Tenth century painting, crude and rough in exe- 
cution, he compared to twentieth century cartoons, 
in that certain set torms were observed, although 
the artist was capable of different technique. He 
showed mural decoration of churches, closely re- 
lated to Byzantine mosaics. He sketched the grad- 
ual breaking away from conventions, growth of 
freedom, of movement, etc. 

Omitting intermediary stages up to the fourteenth 
century, he showed paintings of Simone Martini, 
Sienese, and representations of the life of St. An- 
thony, the hermit. 

In the sixteenth century the influence of great 
Italian painters was marked. St. Man,' Magdalene 
was shown, and the famous painting of St. Augus- 
tine at his devotion, artist unknown. 

Flemish influence characterized the early Cas- 
tilian school. The faces combine curiously Spanish 
and Flemish elements. The drawing is delightful; 
there is a character of naivete, a spirit of charm, a 
softness of color suggested even by slides. A strange 
anachronism is shown in the "Death of the Mr- 
gin,'' where an apostle is wearing the horn glasses 
then fashionable in Spain. 

In presenting "El Greco," Professor Clark noted 
his command over foreshortening, shown through 



i 

of th< head. V. 

"Three Persons of I h< I rii 

nd " Portrait of Hi- - 

Rib risi Child an-: 

shown, also hi- " Ma{ 
hi^h id<al of Sp; 

Moro n : 
painters to royalty. W» 
Philip II." with < ourt cos 
eluding an enormous ruff. 

Ruellas of Southern Spain is farm. 
genre work. Muiillo's well known "Ri 
the Well," "Moses Smiting the Ro<k." "Tl 
gin Learning Her Letters from St. Ann." 
Immaculate Conception." "Madonna of the Nap- 
kin." "Madonna of the Rosary," yav. 
realization of tl and qualhr 

Professor ("lark next treated Velasquez, whom 
he termed "the greatest of Spanish master-." He 
emphasized hi.- great problem, lighting, hi- 
tive and yet -triking treatment of it. W< 
brought to realize the applicability of Horace's 
"aurea mediocrites" to Velasquez through his 
range of subject: portrait of King Philip I 
Velasquez's wife, Don Carlos, numr 
children, including Infanta Margarita. His peas- 
ant type was shown in "The Topers " the 
an with the Eggs." the "Water Carrier." Velas- 
quez'- "Lancers" Pr 'ark considered per- 
haps "the only great historical painting." He em- 
phasized the realistic sense of hosts 

Lastly he showed examples of Go- 
peasant scenes, as the "Harvesters" and the 
den Party." a "Bull-fight." He concluded 
what he termed "caricature portraiture." in this 
case of royalty. 

Professor Clark kindly offered to recommend 
books and lines ot study for thos 
ested in this subject. 



Address to be Given at Vespers. March i. 



The speaker at vespers on Sunday, 
will be Mr. Wilbert B. Smith. Secretary the 

Student Volunteer Movement for Foreign M '-- 
Mr. Smith will speak on some tyj - "k for 

which Christian women are needed in other coun- 
tries. Mr. Smith will be remember - rceful 
and acceptable speaker this year at And ver, and 
at some of the Cambridge meel 

[Dorothy M. Gostenhofer, 1914. 

Secretarv of the Missionary Committee. 



THE WELLESLEY COLLEGE NEWS. 



FREE PRESS. 



I. 

"Oh say, can you see by the dawn's early light — " 
So we sang in chapel, on the morning of the 
twenty-second of February, and we got through 
the first stanza very well indeed, singing the words 
with the cheerful unconcern that comes from fa- 
miliarity. But with the second stanza, what a 
change took place! Instead of fairly well ennunciat- 
ed words, there were wavering "la — las" finally 
dying into disconcerted silence. The choir soared 
ahead, accompanied by a few courageous voices 
determined not to give up the struggle. Then 
"The land of the free and the home of the brave" 
came in for much more than its due share of vigor- 
ous and enthusiastic melody. Everyone endeavored 
to make up in that one phrase for the slight done 
the rest of the song. 

Pooi, misused Star-spangled Banner! It bears 
the stains and tears of many a bitter battle fought 
between our patriotism and our ignorance. Yes, 
ignorance, unforgivable ignorance. To be sure, we 
have the misfortune to possess a difficult national 
song, but, here at Wellesley, of all places, we are 
learning to conquer difficulties. Let's learn those 
three baffling stanzas to-night. Then let's ask to 
have it sung in chapel within the next week. And 
on that morning let's prove that there is one place 
in the United States wher<_ the national song is not 
murmured and hummed, but sung with joyous cer- 
tainty. K. K. D., 1914. 

II. 

"And what is this little room, here?" Thus a 
visiting Radcliffe friend questioned us, as we were 
returning from a visit to the Bookstore. 

"This? Oh, this is the lunch-room where the 
Freshmen and a goodly number of commuters seek 
sustenance after their morning's exertions. Ye-es, 
it is rather small, but then, you know we are allowed 
to sit on the floor in the corridor here, when the 
congestion is too great, and that helps out a lot!" 

"H'm," was our friend's only comment, but the 
tone spoke volumes, and we thanked our lucky 
stars that she would be spared the sight of the lunch- 
room half an hour later. 

Only to those who have stood in line a weary ten 
minutes, to find when their turn comes, that the 
chocolate or the soup has given out, or that there is 
a total deficiency in the way of spoons, then after 
this delay are obliged to sit out in the curridor and 
imbibe dust and germs with their soup — only, to 
those, I say, is the great obnoxiousness of our 
lunch-room apparent. 

When we speak of this evil to others, we receive 
some vague reply of "the Studem's Building," 



that is supposed to be convincing and final as a 
mitigation of our woes. The question is, however, 
will the Students' Building supply the need of a 
lunch-room in College Hall? If it is to have a 
lunch-room as finely managed and equipped as has 
Radcliffe, we bow down before it. Yet another 
question arises. The Freshmen presumably bring 
their lunches to College Hall in order to save the 
time and the fatigue of a trip to the Village. With 
our Students' Building as far or farther from College 
Hall, than the present dormitories, will the Fresh- 
men wish to take the time and trouble to put on 
wraps and walk so far, when their own village 
dining-rooms are only a step farther? 

Moreover, the new Building cannot be ready for 
use for more than one year. Must we suffer all 
that time when a little thought and money would 
help us out so much? To take out the partitions 
between the three tiny rooms of our present lunch- 
room, to put in a good-sized counter the length of 
the room, and have at least two maids to manage 
the soup and chocolate, respectively, to have enough 
chairs and a superfluity of spoons — this would be 
luxury, indeed, and though still in the primitive 
stages, would be cne step toward civilization. They 
say that charity begins at home. Where are the 
missionaries? 1914- 

III. 

It is to be greatly hoped that the Suffrage Question 
Box will be taken advantage of. People have com- 
plained that all the expressions of public opinion in 
the News are destructive and fault-finding ones; 
here is a chance to make the News a real disperser 
of real opinions, constructive and positive as well 
as negative and destructive. Further, it is a golden 
chance, and perhaps the only chance for the Antis 
to prove (?)that they really do know as much about 
the question, and care as much about the welfare 
and advance of the country as the Suffragists do. 
So, Antis, seize your chance and stuff the question 
box, and here's to your stumping the Suffrage 
League — only you won't! Do you accept the 
challenge? 

1912.^ 
IV. 

There has been a great deal of talk about credit 
cards. In my humble opinion, there has been alto- 
gether too much talk about credit cards. With 

A.ININA I. WHALEN, 
GOWNS 

9 EAST CENTRAL ST., NATICK. Tel. 274-3 Natick. 

Reception, Dinner, Evening and Street JGowns. Exclusiv* 
designs. College dresses featured. Separate waists. 



THE W E L L E S L E Y COLLEGE NEWS 



memories <>i school-days when one hurried straight 
home wit li mic's "reporl " withoul looking al i' . and 

was taught ilial ii was "ungent lemanly" to a-k 
oilier people about their mark , because talk aboul 
mi li i Kings was sun- to breed envy or boa -t fulnet 
all the "What did yon get's" and "Whal did she 

give you's" seem ral her rude, tO -■>: I he lea it. I 

a week it was impossible to go near a group of girls 
without hearing echoes of "My dear! Three A's! 
Oh, ('!" Probably the result of it all will be to 
raise the academic standard l.\ an encouraging or 
challenging process. Probably it is good for us to 
know our own marks, that we may make a manly- 
appraisal of ourselves, but it is surely hardly net es- 
sary that all our friends should know them — it is 
certainly unnecessary that we should know all our 
friends'! We are studying for the value and the 
pleasure of the studying, not for marks — then why 
do we say such things as " I never would have taken 
that course if I'd known I'd get a C!" Why do we 
talk so much about our marks? It certainly makes 
a very different atmosphere than the one we used 
to dream of as academic. 

1912. 

V. 

Chapel has gone back to the old time, and here 
comes the old plea for a better attendance at morn- 
ing chapel. Mr. Durant wished to have even- girl 
at chapel, to begin the dav with a quiet, receptive 
mind, sensitive to any great or good thought that 
might come to hei during the day; armored against 
petty moods. Since the college was founded with 



ax brothers 

TZorists 

143 Trcmont Street, Boston. 

Opposite Temple Place Subway Station. 

CHOICE ROSES, VIOLETS AND ORCHIDS 

Constantly on hand. 

Mail and Telephone Orders Promptly Filled. 
Telephones Oxford 574 and 22167. 

FREE DELIVERY TO WELLESLEY. 




that purpc I that 

purpose, ) it fair to 
1 lie people who 

what < omiort and !<• 

find in regular chapel attendant • have 

tried it for • :.iir thing I 

1 onsidering the nal m 

lege; perhaps no better tribute to thi 

power of Mr. Duranl could be found than thi 

termination to go to chapel regulail) I 

and t hen for 1 1 hapel 

services, early in the morning, are thi:.. 

fa -t becoming memories to all of ill be 

glad, when We have left Well. -1. ;. . it the me: 

are very vivid int of th- 

having been often repeated. 

VI. 

From the Si i i k \ 

The remark ol a Middle West farmer's wife about 
Suffrage, who said, as she dusted her floury an 

her apron, "Do I want the ballot? Land. 1 
there's one thing the men can do for themseh 
'em do it!" has never, to my knowledge, been 
answered. The human 54 lifferential 

is a proof that we are highly developed that il 
Why don't we put our whole strength of mind and 
purpose into doing what is distinctly our half of 
the world's work, and let the men keep on doing 
the governing and fighting as they have 
long? On the whole, they have done it fairly well. 
and are doing it better all the time. I look forward 
to an answer from the Suffrage Leag 

1912. 

COLLEGE CALENDAR. 



Saturday, March j. 7.30 P.M. Barnswallows. 

Sunday, March 3, Houghton Memorial Chapel. 
11.00 A.M.. Dr. Henry Van Dyke of Princ 
7.00 P.M., address by Wilbert P. Smith. - 
ject: "Types oi Work in which Christian Y\ 
en are Needed in Other Countries." 

Monday. March 4. College Hall Chapel. 7.30 P.M., 
concert . 

Wednesday, March 6, Houghton Mentor 
7.30 P.M., Organ Recital. 



THE NEW HOT OIL METHOD 

FOR SCALP TREATMENTS. 

This treatment combine 
health. It not only remove? aadrufi 

from the scalp, but penetrates into the s all evi- 

dences of germ invasion .. 

MISSj'IREXE BLISSARD, 

"The Norman." Tel. 471YV ,\\ ellesley, Mass. 



THE WELLESLEY COLLEGE NEWS. 



Wfftfs 



Chocolate 
Bonbons 



ON SALE AT 



Morgan's Pharmacy, 
Clement's Pharmacy, 



WELLESLEY 



TO ALL WELLESLEY GIRLS. 

Vogue says — "Dress, no matter how perfect, is in- 
complete unless the foot is properly clad for each oc- 
casion." 

Our stock, the largest and most varied we have ever 
carried, contains all of the newest innovations. We 
respectfully solicit your patronage. 

THAYER, McNEIL & HODGKINS, 

Makers of Superior Footwear. 
47 Temple Place; 15 West Street, Boston. 



(Continued from page 2.) 

TOPICAL SONG. 



V. 
Typical Wellesley's girl's letter: 

" Dear Dicky: — Could you come on 
To Glee Club this year, 
And since you live near, 

Could you bring another man for Marion? 
Find her the best looking ever. 

Orchids go well with my dress. 
Topical song is so clever. 

Hoping you can come. Yours ever, Bess." 

We're always glad to see you, 

You haven't changed a bit. 
There's the good-looking athlete, 

There's the blase man of wit. 
Black coat tails! 
Glad to see Brown of Harvard, 
Stover of Yale, Bill Penn — 
We're crazy 'bout you, can't do without you, 
So we ask you yearly, 
To hear the music — merely, 
You're just like last year's — nearly, 
Glee Club men! 

VI. 
A Freshman once begged me to lend her 

My shoes, which were dusty and grey. 
"I'll bring them back," 
Said she, "shiny and black." 

Although dazed, I gladly hastened to obey. 
Said she, " I hope you won't tell her 

She's already polished mine, 
My Senior shines in the cellar, 

And I've got to have another shine." 



Chorus. 
Come, let us shine your shoes, girls, 

They need it, goodness knows! 
Shine for the Student Building — 
Let us black your heels and toes. 
Ten pennies! 
All the celebs are bootblacks. 
First-class shine for a dime! 

Such looking shoestrings ! Do buy some new strings. 
Make your tan shoes brighter," 
And make near white pumps whiter, 
Make your pocket lighter, 
Have a shine! 



NOTICES. 

If any one has a 191 1 Legenda which she is will- 
ing to sell, will she please notify Gertrude M. Robe- 
son, 84 Stone Hall? 

Lost — A fountain pen with gold band, marked 
N. W. Finder kindly return to Natalie .Williams, 
318 College Hall. 

Lost — Will the person who found the fur-lined 
gloves left in 221 C. H., last Saturday, A. M., kind- 
ly return them to 305 C. H.? 

Lost — On South Natick road, Sunday, February 
18, a brown striped fur muff. J. H. Batchelder, 
Leighton road, Wellesley. 



tickets ornni^i/ copley 

all nrKKILK square 

THEATRES ilM^iMVlV BOSTON 

(KEY NUMBER) 232S CONNECTING OUR EIVE PHONES ON ONE NUMBER 



A. G. SPALDING & BROS. 

Headquarters for 

Official Athletic Supplies 

FREE — Spaldine's handsome Illustrated Catalogue. 

A. G. SPALDING & BROS., 
141 federal St., - - - - Boston. 



EVERY REQUIREMENT OF THE TRAVELER 

Railroad Tickets, Steamship Tickets, Pullman Reservations, Hotel 
Reservations. All Lines. 

Travel Information About Everywhere. 

Rates, Sailings and Diagrams mailed upon request. Corre- 
spondence Respectfully Solicited. 

ISIDOR HERZ CO., 422 7th Ave., between 33rd and 34th Sts., New York. 

S. F. Schleisner, Manager. Established 20 years. 



THE WELLESLEY COLLEGE ' 




PARLIAMENT OF FOOLS. 



THE RETURN. 

My week-end visit now is passed. 

To Wellesley I return al lasl . 

I nless my friends have been unkind, 

My Idler box quite full I'll find. 

Right merrily I dash to sec, 

Thin, finding thai I've losl my key, 

I borrow one from Emmeline, 

Who has a box right nexl to mine. 

Supplied with this, with hat pins too, 

1 try to see what I can do 

I stretch, I poke, I fume and fret, 

But poor results I seem to get, 

Until at last, by reaching hard, 

I manage to dislocate a card. 

And then I get a chance to see 

The note it covered formerly. 

Ah me! my brow grows cold and dump 

On viewing there a one-cent stamp. 

It is an "ad," or else worse still, 

From the tea-room my monthly bill! 

No more to reach it do I try, 

I think I'd better let it lie. 

Up-s1airs I go to Emmeline, 

Where, with my friend, I can repine. 

I tell her of the times so gay, 

I had while recently away. 

But with surprise says Emmy dear, 

"I did not know vou were not here." 



DEVELOPING AND PRINTING, PORTRAIT 

PHOTOGRAPHY, BIRTHDAY AND 

WEDDING GIFTS 

IN 

TECO POTTERY, BRASS. 
PICTURES, 

CIRCULATING LIBRARY. 



RENTING DEPARTMENT.-We are continuing tho rent- 
ing of pictures, and in addition are renting Portable Elec- 
trics, Jardinieres, Tea Tables and Shirt-Waist Boxes. 



Ah, friend I in your word-' gentle 
I find not solace but a blow. 

M.I 



A GLEE CLI B BALLAD. 



ABELL STUDIO AND GIFT SHOP 



WEULESLEV 



Oh listen to ye ballad of . t dr. 

How she had a man for Glee Club — and a 
good time tl 

Ye ■ ollcgc girl to Teddy of Harvard sent a 

" ( in you come to Glee < lul> concert at V. 

she wrote. 
Ted said he'd be delighted, but learned, to his 

despair, 
Cousin Kate was to be married then: he -imply 

must be there! 
Miss Wellesley, nothing daunted, v 

Bill at Penn. 
Couldn't he come up for (dee Club? Alas! Bill 

flunked out just then. 
"Well, I guess I won't go this year, but I think it's 

just too bad! " 
And the thought of her pink chiffon ma<! 

heart feel very sad: 

(Continued on page 13* 



Bailey, Banks & Biddle Co. 

Diamond Merchants, Jewelers. 
Silversmiths, Stationers. 

MAKERS OF CLASS AND S 

BAR PIXS AND OTHER NOVELTJJ - ." 

WELLESLEY COLLEGE 

COLLEGE and SCHOOL EMBLEMS 
and NOVELTIES 

Illustrations and Prices of Clas- 
Emblems. ~ urns. Plaques. Meda'.s 

Spoons, etc.. mailed up 1 -ms 

are executed in the workshops or. the -ind 

are of the highest grade of finish and qv... 

CLASS RINGS 

Particular attention gi 

signing and manufacture of I 

1218-20-22 CHESTNUT STREET. 

PHILADELPHIA. 



10 



THE WELLESLEY COLLEGE NEWS. 



vj Irvll M'ity'.m, 


'^^^^=^ ^^^^^^^jil 




== =^-= -= =- ^<^£0 ^yC'^JMS 


m m I -. OR! 



ALUMNA DEPARTMENT. 



ENGAGEMENTS. 



Carol Spencer Prentice, 1913, to Otis Wilson 
Williams, of New York. 

Florence F. Talpey, 1912, to Ben Ames Williams, 
of Jackson, Ohio, Dartmouth, 1910. 



MARRIAGES. 



Dunlap — Logan. At Allegheny, Pennsylvania, 
on February 8, 1912, Alice L. Logan, 1901, to Dr. 
Robert Weyer Dunlap. At home after June the 
first, at Teng Chow, Shantung, China. 

Gormam— Nash. In Savannah, Georgia, on 
February 10, Gwendolyn Nash, daughter of Mrs. 
Mattie Chenault Nash, '84-'86, to Douglas Gor- 
man. 



DEATHS. 

On January 25, 1912, at her home near Jackson- 
ville, Illinois, Mrs. Dicy Dunlap, at the age of one 
hundred years and eleven months. Mrs. Dunlap 
was the great-grandmother of Alice F. Wadsworth, 
1910, Mary J. Wadsworth, 1913, and Margaret 
Ayers, 191 5. 

CHANGE OF ADDRESS. 



Mrs. Jeannette Vail Shipley to 204 East Twelfth 
Street, Wichita, Kansas. 



NEWS OF THE WELLESLEY CLUBS. 



The annual luncheon of the Cleveland Wellesley 
Club was held during the holidays at the Colonial 
Club. Covers were laid for thirty-one, including 
several of the undergraduates. The luncheon and 
business meeting which followed, were but fore- 
runners of the interesting history of Wellesley, 
which the president, Miss Arline Burdick, '09, in- 
troduced as the programme for the afternoon. 
Miss Frances Seaton, '88, in recalling her own life 



and experiences at Wellesley. gave everyone a 
splendid impression of the "Times and Customs of 
the Early Days." 

Miss Belle Sherwin, '90, introduced a "Group of 
Old Masters." As the pictures of the early instruct- 
ors were thrown on the screen, _she gave a telling 
character sketch of each, bringing out their striking 
personalities. 

Miss Agnes Andrews, '12, and Miss Helen Stearns, 
'14, gave news of the present Wellesley, in telling 
of the improvements in campus and buildings, and 
of the joys of play hours. 

Miss Ida Ellison, '05, gave the closing toast, an 
appreciation of President Pendleton. The luncheon 
ended with the singing of Alma Mater. 

The annual fall banquet of the Worcester Welles- 
ley Club took place at Hale's banquet hall on Main 
Street, October 28. Mrs. Christobel Kidder of 
Boston was the guest of the club for the afternoon. 
A business meeting followed the luncheon at which 
it was decided to give another play in 1912 for the 
benefit of the Student Building Fund. Miss Hen- 
derson gave an exceedingly interesting report of her 
trip to Wellesley as the club's delegate to the in- 
auguration of President Pendleton. 

On January 2, Miss Marion Knowles, 1910, 
opened her home at 838 Main Street for the club's 
winter tea. Miss Knowles was assisted in receiving 
by the officers of the club, Mrs. Albert E. Flint, 
President, Mrs. Arthur Graves, Vice-president, 
and Miss Ethel Howe, Secretary and Treasurer. 
About seventy-five club members and undergrad- 
uates were present. 



LITERARY NOTES. 



Mrs. Eva Beede Odell of Brookline, student in 
1881-82, has recently published a small book of 
poems. 

Mrs. Antoinette Bryant Hervey, student in 
1884-86, has an article in a late "Outlook" on 
"The Saints in My Kitchen." 



THE WELLESLEY < OLLEGE NEWS 



11 



□ [ 



D 



D 



j n=n □ □ □ t=i [ 



1 z 



1. $. fcollanber & Co. 



B06ton 



IWcw Dorh 



MANNISH WAISTS, SHIRTINGS, SILK NECK-WEAR, 

MACKINAW COATS, BLAZERS, POLO COATS. 

Special Attention is Called to Our New Heavy 
Weight English Norfolk Blazers. 



202 anb 216 ^oplston Street, Boston 



a 



3 □ □ □ 



The Oratory Class of the Cantabrigia Club 
of Cambridge, has chosen for its annual spring play 
■"The Golden Goblet," by Louise Rand Bascom, 
I907- 

NEWS NOTES. 

Miss Emily G. Balch is one of the members of 
the Social Research Council of Boston which has 
just been organized in affiliation with the Depart- 
ment of Social Ethics at Harvard University. This 
Council aims to offer scientific assistance to persons 
and institutions making social investigations of any 
kind, and is made up of a group of persons who 
have been and still are in touch with research en- 
terprises. 

'81 — Susan Searle, President of Kobe College 
in Japan, who has been taking a rest in California, 
has returned to Japan. 

'93 — Mary Dillingham Frear, wife of Governor 
Frear of the Hawaiian Islands, with her two little 
girls has been spending the winter at Newton Centre. 

'95 — Mabel Davison Bentley is spending the 
winter in the South with her husband and son. 

'96 — Abbie Paige, head of the Social Work De- 
partment of the Boston Women's Educational 
and Industrial Union, presided at a conference oi 
committee members at which Miss Anna F. Welling- 



ton of the Association of Collegiate Alumnae told 
what that organization is doing to interest college 
graduates in social service. 

Annie F. Wilson is the Social Secretary of Em- 
manuel Church, Boston. Her work has brought her 
into contact with the patients of the so-called 
"Emmanuel Movement" who come from all over 
the country. 

Lydia K. Wilkins is Scientific Assistant in the 
Library Science Department of Agriculture. Wash- 
ington, D. C. 

1900 — Alice Rowe is making an extended western 
trip, visiting Wellesley girls in Washington, ( 
and California. 

1904 — Mr. and Mrs. J. de Morinni, [Clara 
and little daughters Lisbeth and Pegg} are in Paris, 
France, for an indefinite stay. They m 
dressed 28 Rue de quatre Septembre, cai 5 
ec Son. 

I 9°5 — Grace Humphrey, having spent sis years 
conducting a small private school in Springfield. 
Illinois, has now a position at Fly Court. Greenwich. 
Connecticut. 

Sally Reed is teaching in the Veltir School, New 
York.' 

1906 — Alma Shinier spent the summer abroad. 
and for this year has a position a: rhe Elmwood 
School in Buffalo, New York. 



12 



THE WELLESLEY COLLEGE NEWS 




/<fe€ 



In THEIR NEW STORE at 127 Tremont Street 

Ready-to- Wear Department- 

FLANNEL, CHEVIOT, ijLINEN, ^MADRAS AND LINGERIE 

WAISTS 
Made in our own Workroom 

GOWNS^OF SERGE, SILK AND VELVET 
For Morning and Afternoon 

ALSO SILK BREAKFAST GOWNS, {COLLARS, TIES AND 

JABOTS 

GLOVES'FOR STREET AND DRESS* WEAR 



/&rsg 



127 Tremont St. 
Boston, U. S. A. 



1907 — Anna T. Harding is teaching at the Wom- 
en's College, Frederick, Maryland. 

1910 — Mary P. Ingalls is living at the North End 
Union on Parmenter Street, Boston. She is work- 
ing especially among the Jews and Italians. 



SOCIETY NOTES. 



Agora. 
At a regular meeting ot the Agora Society, held 
Saturday evening, February 17, the program con- 
sisted of a discussion of the problems of Sanitary 
Water Supply, Sewage and Street Cleaning. The 
characters were: 



President of the Board of Health, 

Belle Ranny, 1912 
Member of the Board of Health, 

Abbie Caldwell, 19 12 
State Officer of Health (Inspector of Water 

Supply), Celia Hersey, 19 13 

Engineer, Mildred Fenner, 19 12 

Head of Street Cleaning Department, 

Elizabeth Scudder, 1913 
Representative of the International Sewage 

Disposal Co., Myra Morgan, 1912 

A Distinguished Guest, an Inspector of Sanitary 
Conditions in Foreign Countries, 

Ying Mei Chun, 19 13 



THE 

Wellesley Tea Room 

. ..AND 

Food Shop 

ALICE G. COOMBS, Wellesley, '93 

Taylor Block, Wellesley Square Over Post Office 
Telephone Connection 



The Denton Collection of Butterflies 

Will be on exhibition in the 

WUNDERLY BROTHERS' ART GALLERY, 
337 SIXTH AVENUE, PITTSBURGH, PA. 

Your friends near Pittsburgh may 
like to visit the free exhibition from 

February 26th to^March 9th inclusive. 



I II K W E L L ES L E V C L I. I. G E N E \V -> 



Wigs. Ue/irds, Switches, CurM, Puff* 1:1c, to Mire for Am- 
ateur Theatrical! ami all Stage Production! Orcaw, 
Paints, l'»wderis, l.urnl C»rk, Hourc*. l.ic. 

M. (i. SLATTERY, IKB^eet WIGS, 

226 TRGMONT STREET, BOSTON, 
Between Eliot and LaGrange Sta., Opp Maje 

CompcNI Makeup Artists Furnishpd. Spuidl Allmlion fn»m It 0;kf W«rt 

Tel. Oxfor-1 2382-J. 

LUNCH AT 

THE CONSIGNORS' UNION 

48 Winter Street. 
Lunch, 1 1 to 3 Afternoon Tea, 3 to 5 

Home-made Bread, Cake, Pies, etc., Served aad on Sale. 
PARLIAMENT OF FOOLS Continued. 



"I, ci me ask Jack for you, dear," said sympa- 
thizing Nell, 
•' I know he'd be delighted, and I might jusl aswell." 
Jack wrote at once th'assurance that he would 

love U> come, 
Then developed tonsilitis, and had to stay at home; 
But telegraphed, "I'm sending my roommate 

down instead, 
You met him at the Channings. Corking boy. 

His name is Ted." 
And so, poetic justice, on the irony of fate, 
She had a "Ted" for Glee Club, though he came 

in rather late. 
And Miss Welleslcy says, quite blythely, "Yes, 

I had the nicest time! 
' Mr. Ted' was very charming, and the concert 

was sublime." L. D. W., 1914. & 



When all is said and done, my dear, 
You really must acknowledge 

That auction bridge is far more fun 
Than credit cards, at college. 



Some cornflakes crisp, a jar of cream, and Care 
Flown from the precincts of the Morris-chair, 
Oh college life were Paradise, I'd swear. 



WRIGHT & DITSON, 

ATHLETIC SUPPLIES, 

BOSTON, NEW YORK, CHICAGO, 
San Francisco, Providence, Cambridge. 



COOK'S RESTAURANT, 

88 Boylston Street 

Next to Colonial Theater 

:: :: Matinee Lunches :: :: 



Miss Ruth liodgkins, 



OLI> INATICK l x >s 

BOUttl "s.iili<_k, Mnis. 

One mile from Welletlc) Collete 

lireakfatt, 8 to I hinncr. I to 1 * 

lea-room open from J t€ '• 

Spiclal \ttcntion Paid lo V. . rtic» 

Tel. Natlck MIX NISI HARRIS, **r. 

HOLDEN'8 Studio 

20 /North Avenue, /Natick 

Hij^h Oracitj Portraits 

icicptinne Connection 

1 1 si El 

[Oil t I I'SHI 

Shampooing, Facial Treatment 9 l"r» ■•mem, 

M:inii Bring, Half I 

Taylor Block, Rooma 1-5-4, Ovec Bank, Welleaiey 
1 elephonc 1 ZZ-^K 
Open from S.M, V M to », I' M 

Mondaj - until B, P. II. 

WELLESLEV FRUIT STORE 

Carries a full line of choice (ruit. Confection- 
ery and other goods. Fancy Crackers Pista- 
chio nuts and all kinds of salted nut's. Olhe 
Oil and Olives of all kinds 

Tel. i38\v. GEO. BARKAS 

Dry and Fancy Goods 
NOVELTIES 

MAGUIRE, 



The Norman. jt 

Jt Wellesley Sq. 



B. L. KARTT, 

Ladies' Tailor and f : urrier, 

Cleansing and D\eing. Alter- 
ing Ladies' Suiti a Specialty. 

543 Washington St.. Welleslcy Square. 
Oppoiite Post-Office. Telephone Welfcele) :i7-R. 



F. H. PORTER, 

WELLESLEV SQLARE 

— DEALER IN — 

Picture Cord, Coat Hangers. Rods, Mission Stains. 
All Kinds Small Hardware. 

£? j& PLUMBING j& £> 

Sturtevant <Sc Haley 

BEEF AND SUPPLY 
COMPANY .? * * * 

3S and 40 Faneuil Hall Market. Boston 

Telephone 933 Richmond 

Hotel Supplies a Special rj 

TAILBY, THE WELLESLEY FLORIST 

Office, 555 Washington St. Tel. -i -1=2 

Conservatories. 103 Linden St Tel. 44-1 

Orders by Mail or Otherwise are Gi\en Prompt Attention 

J. TAILBY & SONS, Props., Wellesley. Mass. 



THE WELLESLEY COLLEGE NEWS. 




Real Oriental 
Kimonos . . . 



Win the admiration of 
your classmates by 
wearing a V a n t i n e 
Kimono ! They have 
tone, elegance and 
style that will distin- 
guish you as a girl of 
taste and refinement. 

Prices from $3.50 to $35 

Write "Yuki San" for 
Kimono Book 



£&^~Cl£vC>& 




The Oriental Store. 



360 to 362 Boylston St. 
Boston, Mass. 

Also New York and 
Philadelphia 







Ladies' Hatter 

60 Tremont St., - Boston. 

Over Moseley's Shoe Store. 



WELLESLEY INN 



Look for WeHesley Inn 
Slip Sheet Announcing 

MIDYEAR SPECIALTIES.